Wednesday, 15 August 2012

Wild Bird Wednesday 05 Papuan Frogmouth

These birds an Papuan Frogmouths (Podargus papuensis) - the largest of the frogmouths found in Australia.  I saw these birds on an early morning river trip on the Daintree.  There is no way I would have found them with the help of the guide on the boat, for these birds have remarkable camouflage.

With their heads pulled upwards they bear more than a passing resemblance to a chunk of wood! Although commonly mistaken for owls these birds are actually more closely related to Nightjars.  They are a nocturnal bird they feeds on moths and such like.  By day they roost in trees, where their camouflage can make them very difficult to spot.




These birds are about 50 - 60 cm long and at night make a far carrying and rather strange sounding call.

We get a different species of frogmouth at home some times - you can see a post here and here.

You can find the latest post to my other blog by clicking on the Paying Ready Attention image on the RHS of the screen.

Now its your turn to get involved with WBW 5.  Click on the link below to add you wild bird image to this collection.  Link back to this page and visit the other birders out there.

Cheers - Stewart M

31 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

funky - almost creepy-looking - birds!

VaishVijay said...

wonderfully camouflaged!

Arija said...

Well spotted! They certainly are different to the pair I once spotted in our Mt.Lofty garden. They were exactly the same grey as the monterey pine branch they perched on high up in the tree.

Kristi Bowman said...

You're so right, I did think it was a chunk of wood. I had to go back and look again. What an interesting bird!!

NatureFootstep said...

yes, I really had to look closely to see them. Such strange looking birds. I can´t understand how you did find them in the first place. :) Nice job.

Brian King said...

I wouldn't have even known there was a bird there. I'm still having trouble making it out well. Very strange looking birds!

Gail Dixon (Louisiana Belle) said...

Wow, you're not kidding! They blend in perfectly with their surroundings. I had to enlarge the photos to see them. Wonderful catch!

Pat Tillett said...

wow! I've never heard of these interesting birds before.

Andrea said...

I don't think I have ever seen a more peculiar bird ... nor have I ever heard of it. I had to study the pictures to even spot it because I wasn't sure what I was looking at. You are just full of surprises ... You should be a tour guide. I do need to come to Australia, it seems to be a wonderfully interesting place to say nothing of the friendliness of the people. Thanks Stewart, I love it ...

Andrea @ From The Sol

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Those guys are eerie -- I had to look and look, even after your explanation. -- very interesting post. Birds next week from here, I hope! (They're still in my camera).

HOOTIN ANNI said...

I've never heard of these....they look odd and kinda eerie.

mick said...

Very interesting photos. There are so many birds up north that we don't see at all further south.

eileeninmd said...

What a cool sighting, Stewart. They are awesome looking birds. I have seen one in the zoo but to see them in the wild is much more exciting. Thanks for sharing, great shots.

bailey-road.com said...

Interesting bird. I see why they're called Frogmouths.

Carole M. said...

Stewart I'd never heard of this frogmouth; it is amazing! Nature is spectacular ...

Island Rambles Blog said...

I looked twice to find them! What a weird bird. I checked the other link, first link will not work for me, goes to your editor, second link works great and I saw the other Frogmouth and read about it...I really appreciate the effort you are going to and that you continued on this bird meme..your blog has so many unusual birds you are the perfect one to host this. If there was no Wednesday bird meme what would we do!

Kusum said...

Frogmouth is very elusive! Great capture!

Jean said...

I had to really...really study your photos in order to make them out. Wow...they remind me of our great camouflage savvy birds.

i stora drag said...

Great photos of the strangelooking birds, which I of course, never even heard about before!
The second photo you can see how they kept their eyes closed.
Cool and a bit fun too!
Greetings from Pia in Sweden

Nancy Claeys said...

Prehistoric-looking birds. :)

Hanne Bente said...

Great pictures you show of a bird I do not know / or have heard about.
Hanne Bente

Debbie said...

they sure do know how to hide!!

Gowri Saligram said...

Wow, I didn't know Australia had frogmouths! We have only one species here - the SriLankan Frogmouth. I find them cute! I loved the Tawny Frogmouth too - what eyes!

Gillian Olson said...

Odd looking critters, and I bet hard to spot.

SandyCarlson said...

These are great photos, Stewart. How we adapt to our environments!

Liz said...

Cool bird and rather elusive!! They are quite odd but fascinating.

Thanks for hosting, Stewart... I almost didn't make it this week.

einfachtilda said...

Ich weiƟ jetzt nicht, was du meintest, denn ich habe doch meinen Vogel hier bei dir eingetragen.
Kannst du mich bitte mal informieren, was du meintest?

LG Mathilda

Anni said...

...thanks for linking up at the Bird D'Pot this week. Your participation is much appreciated.

Rambling Woods said...

That is the most unusual bird...Interesting post Stewart. I has once asked one of the ornithologists at Cornell about the sunbathing behavior and they don't know for sure why, but your explanation is one of the theories. I have only seen it in chickadees here...I also found this little bit off info.. Michelle

http://birding.about.com/od/birdbehavior/a/Bird-Sunning.htm

Phil said...

Stewart, Frogmouths are a family of birds to just dream about over here as you will know. Up in Lancashire even Nightjars are as rare as hen's teeth.

By the way I linked to your blog in the RH column but my recent post days haven't coincided with your own, but are from a day ot two before. I'll do better next time. Phil

Mary Howell Cromer said...

I am having such a late start to viewing, but oh to see a Frogmouth, that must be ever so cool. Really neat birds!