Wednesday, 13 October 2021

Wild Bird Wednesday 481 - Long-billed Corella (and a video)

Recently I met a new local birder, and we spent a coupe of hours wandering around Wattle Park, a park on my local patch.

During that time we found a flock of over 25 Long-billed Corellas (Cacatua tenuirostris) and a single Little Corella as well, just for variety!

These are some of the Long-billed Corellas.




After the trip, Guillaume (the new birder!) asked if I would be interviewed for his birding video / podcast channel.  Of course I said yes! Maybe you would like to have a listen to what I have to say - or at least after 481 WBWs you find out what I look and sound like!

 

So, with a little bit of new content, its over to you.  Click the link to join in with WBW.  SM


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Wednesday, 6 October 2021

Wild Bird Wednesdy 480 - Kingfishers

This week Melbourne achieved the unenviable distinction of being the town that has spent the longest time in lock down as a result of you know what.  A while ago in an attempt to raise my spirits, I collated all the pictures of Kingfishers I had taken and shared them a day at a time on Facebook.  People seemed to like them, so here is the collection.

Blue Winged Kookaburra - Australia

Forest Kingfisher - Australia

Common Kingfisher - UK

Laughing Kookaburra - Australia

Little Kingfisher - Australia

Sacred Kingfisher - Australia

White Fronted Kingfisher - India

Azure Kingfisher - Australia

Wonderful birds one and all.  Lets hope we are all out and about soon.

As ever, to join in with WBW click the link below.  SM

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Wednesday, 29 September 2021

Wild Bird Wednesday 479 - Yellow-throated Miner

These images are rather more abstract than some of the ones I post - but I like them.

These are (or this is) Yellow-throated Miners (Manorina flavigula) in the Mallee.  I am not sure I would have really identified them as such without help, but luckily help was on hand.  In the future I will look for the distinctive white rump which is a clear field mark.

We are slowly coming out of lockdown - and now all of my family is double jabbed, so we have done our bit for the community.




The Yellow-throated Miner is found across mainland Australia, and I suppose that the Mallee counts as that!

Hope all is well.  To join in with WBW, click on the link below.  SM

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Wednesday, 22 September 2021

Wild Bird Wednesday 478 - Turquoise Parrot

The Turquoise Parrot (Neophema pulchella) is a smallish, but rather wonderful looking parrot that I managed to see a few months back when I was able to travel to the North Central town of Glen Rowan.  It will be at least 6 weeks before I can make a similar journey.

I was given some information about where I may be able to find the birds, and spent a good part of two days at this spot!  I manged to get some good views - although some of them were near the end of the day when the light was fading.

But as you can see, I did manage to get some pictures.  Hope you enjoy this rather wonderful bird.












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Tuesday, 14 September 2021

Wild bird Wednesday 477 - Rainbow Lorikeet

These pictures were taken last week, when it was clear - at least to these Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus moluccanus) - that spring was in the air.  This pair of birds were investigating a hollow log, probably as a nesting site.  I went back the next day, and unfortunately, the log was free from lorikeets. 

I plan to go back soon, and have a look for this couple!










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Wednesday, 8 September 2021

Wild Bird Wednesday 476 - Spotted Pardalote

Spotted Pardalotes (Pardalotus punctatus) are tiny birds, with a wing span of about 50-60 mm.  They spend much of their time feeding high in the canopy of gum trees.  They have a distinctive double note call, and for much of the time they are easier to hear than see.  They nest in tunnels that they excavate into banks, such as stream side and road cuttings. 

These birds were nesting just below a bridge over a small stream (drain!) in a local park, and their regular movements in and out of the nest hole made them much easier to see than normal.  I think I have seen them described as 'confiding' and they certainly came closer to me than most birds do.  There were a number of branches that had fallen over the stream that they tended to land on prior to entering the nest hole.  They are very fast moving and great fun to watch.

The male birds have a yellow chest and white spots on the crown, while the females have plain chests and yellow spots in the crown.













Unfortunately, a couple of days after I took most of these pictures we had a day of heavy rain and the stream where these birds were nesting flooded, submerging the nest tunnel.  The pair of birds were still in the area, so maybe they will try to nest again.  I will keep an eye on these birds, as the park with the steam is one of the few places I can visit during lockdown!

As ever, to join in with WBW, just click on the link/ button below.  Cheers  SM


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