Wednesday, 26 August 2015

Wild Bird Wednesday 161 - Kittiwake

A brief post this week due to me being on the road this week.

This weeks WBW birds are again from Bempton Cliffs in East Yorkshire in the UK.  These birds are Kittiwakes - or to give them their world wide common name Black-Legged Kittiwakes.

There formal name is Rissa tridactyla and these birds from the Atlantic are unusual in that they have a very small hind toe, or even no hind toe at all.  This is not the kind of thing you find out everyday!

Anyway, I rather like these fine looking birds, and the places in which they nest and raise chicks are remarkable.





Now it's over to you and your blogs - so click on the link below and off you go.  I'll be in touch when I get back home!  SM

39 comments:

Chris Rohrer said...

This is a really interesting bird that I have yet to see any form of:) Hopefully next month, we'll get to spot one. They are super interesting! Wonderful photos.

HOOTIN ANNI said...

Fabulous images again Stewart.

Silver Parrot said...

Great shots of cliff nesting. I can't imagine trying to parent in such a small space, but they seem to make it work.

EG CameraGirl said...

Obviously they are not afraid of heights. :))

Phil Slade said...

I love to see but mostly I love to hear Kittiwakes. Unfortunately the only Kittiwakes here on the west coast are silent fly pasts usually after or during storms or westerly winds.

Connie Smiley said...

Oh, that is remarkable, Stewart! Good thing they can fly.

Brian King said...

Great shots, Stewart! Talk about living on the edge!

Sharon Wagner said...

Precarious!

eileeninmd said...

Hello Stewart, they are new birds to me! Some day I hope to see one! Your photos are awesome. Have a great week!

Kenneth Cole Schneider said...

Those nests are certainly resistant to predators. I did not realize that they built such substantial nests of mud. I have seen them in Alaska, but never got this close to their nests.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

We saw these on one of the boat tours in Alaska. Unfortunately, the one where the narrator wasn't very interested in birds, so didn't give us time for a good view really.

Mama Zen said...

What a place to nest! Wow!

Jo said...

I drool when I see your beautiful photos of Kittewake. Beautiful images. I'll link up my post tomorrow (Wednesday). Greetings, Jo

Author R. Mac Wheeler said...

and we don't let our chicks go to the park alone.

Andrea Priebe said...

Well, I am a bit surprised that you didn't scale the cliffs so you could catch a picture of the foot with the missing toe. But, that said, what an interesting little bird and how brave they are to nest on the narrow ledges of those very steep cliffs. I am curious as to what the phonetic pronuniation of Kittiwake is ... I can think of several options, but don't know which is correct. Fun, interesting and informative as always, Sterwart. Be safe on your travels ...

Andrea @ From The Sol

Ranten said...

Hey Stewart! Great photos! It's impressive how little space they have to nests and chicks :-)

Frank said...

Not a species I get to see very often but their call is unmistakable.

June Caedmon said...

Formidable little birds! Great shots, Stewart. Safe travels.

CountryMum said...

Awesome photos. They seem very precarious nesting on the those little ledges.

DeniseinVA said...

Love the name, I feel I have heard it way back in the old brainbox but maybe this is a case of deja vu. Great photos Stewart, I am very impressed how they build nests on such narrow ledges.

TexWisGirl said...

beautiful cliff dwellers.

Gayle said...

Gives new meaning to 'hangin in there'.

GreenComotion said...

Hi Stewart,
The Kittiwakes are definitely pretty. I want to say they look like a combination of a dove and a Seagull.
In the first photo, I see the little baby Kittiwake in the nest, which is on an edge/rock on the hill.
So, the way these guys raise their young is remarkable! I am sure there are other fine aspects to that.
I love your natural, nature photos of the Kittiwake.
Thanks for hosting.
Have a Beautiful Day!
Peace :)

mick said...

Great photos of the Kittiwakes nesting on the cliffs. I wonder how they teach the little ones to be safe - or do some of them drop over?

Jo said...

Hi Stewart, I re-read your post in the light of day and am fascinated that you zoomed in on their nests. I love the detail about their small hind toe. Brilliant! Thanks for hosting this meme. I'm a bit lean on the birding front while in SA (and during winter) but hope to soon have new spring birds to post. Greetings Jo

Margaret Adamson said...

Yes I agree, these Kittiwakes nest in such small spaces on vertical ledges. Loved the shots. Thanks for hosting. Hope you trip goes well

A Quiet Corner said...

Now there must be a reason they select such narrow places, right? The height of the cliffs totally makes sense for fledglings with the water below. Great photos!!...:)JP

Marilyn Kircus said...

I was trying to figure how you took these wonderful pictures. Were you in a boat? Could you wade or walk to the place you shot from? I have not seen these birds so thanks for sharing.

photodoug said...

Stewart, marvelous birds. Thanks for sharing.

Marie C said...

Amazing birds with their precarious nesting habits! Love your photos! Hope your trip is going well.

Missy George said...

They look like small Pigeons..I hope they forgive me..Not a very friendly habitat..Great shots..

Linda said...

They must have great balancing ability. I like the name Kittiwake.

Mary Cromer said...

Kittiwakes, oh I do enjoy saying that, what a great name for such a great looking bird. I love these shares from up high you have done, and how these birds nest. Very wonderful work presented~

Beth said...

The cliff photos are amazing,

ladyfi said...

Lovely shots.

NC Sue said...

These are amazing shots! You must have been hanging on to the cliff by your toenails to capture them.
I hope to see you at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/08/bennett-place-bit-of-history.html, and please join us each week for Wordless Wednesday (on Tuesday)!

Manuel Antonio Aragón Medina said...

Un blog maravilloso.
Felicidades por tan buen trabajo.
Saludos desde España.

Liz said...

What a great series Stewart! I love their rather dangerously situated nests and you even managed to capture some young birds. I gather they are part of the gull family based on looks?

David Gascoigne said...

Black-legged Kittiwakes nest on the most improbably small ledges, but seem to prosper in such an environment, although I suspect that more than a few eggs and chicks are lost from time to time. I once saw a Great Black-backed Gull at Percé, Québec swoop down on a Kittiwake nest and pluck a youngster from it. It just chucked its head back and the prey was swallowed in one gulp.