Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Wild Bird Wednesday 213 - Orange-footed Scrubfowl

 The Orange-Footed Scrubfowl was the first bird I photographed during my trip to Darwin.  These large, turkey-looking birds were busy in the park just across the road from where I stayed. I was also a bit surprised to find one on the beach later the same day - a true Australian!

This bird is about 45cm long and is a member of the 'mound builders' group.  These birds scrape together  huge mounds of vegetation in which they lay their eggs.  When the eggs hatch, the young birds dig their way to the surface and rush off into the nearest cover.  They receive no care from the parents at all - they are on their own from day one!

These birds are know as Megapodius reinwaardt - which reflects their big feet and the Dutch ornithologist who named them.  This species is found along the northern edge of Australia, but can also be found on some of the islands of Indonesia.  

As you can see from these pictures, these birds could do some serious harm to your garden beds!







I hope that normal service will restored this week - so spread the word far and wide and get as many people as possible to link up.  Cheers.  SM

32 comments:

  1. I've never heard of this one. Very unique looking bird! Nice subdued colors.

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  2. Very impressive birds. Remind me of Olympic champions.

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  3. They have a bit of a devilish look about them and probably rightly so if they do get into your gardens and the fact that they don't offer any training or protection for their young is very strang. A very unusual looking and behaving bird and a new one for me. Another Stewart surprise :) Looks like your trip to Darwin has paid off ... hope you have more surprises for us down the road. Great pictures, of course :)

    Andrea @ From the Sol

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  4. Hello Stewart!:) Gosh! Great shots of a really unusual looking bird,.. it looks very strong, and the youngsters must have to be, if they have to look after themselves from day one. I had never heard of the Orange-footed Scrubfowl until now.

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  5. a bird I saw in Queensland, but your iamges is much better then mine :)

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  6. They definitely do not give up easily. I bet they could tear up a garden. They're impressive birds. genie

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  7. Amazing that the young survive after being left to fend for themselves right from the start! Lovely images of rather a cute looking bird.
    Thank you for hosting and have a wonderful Wednesday.

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  8. Fantastic Orange-footed Scrubfowl, head diving looking for food, really great photos.

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  9. Interesting critter. Cool proportions.

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  10. neat looking bird! powerful feet!

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  11. You certainly do have a way with the birds, Stewart! Very adept, indeed! :)

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  12. they are kind of pretty but how interesting they don't care for their young at all.

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  13. They are kind of whimsical looking.
    Really nice photos Stewart!

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  14. First I've heard or seen of these Stewart. They are a very attractive looking bird & I like the small crest on their the back of their heads. It makes them look somewhat streamlined

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  15. Interesting color patterns. A rather odd-shaped body, or maybe it's the sleek feathers that make it stand out. The crest is a nice touch, too. I imagine they would do some damage to a garden. Hard to believe the young are able to survive on their own so soon.

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  16. these are great shots of this bird as I found them to be illusive adn difficult to capture on camera.

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  17. Interesting bird but glad we do not have them scratching around our garden!! Diane

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  18. Stewart, a new bird for me. Thanks for sharing.

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  19. Definitely something of a Darwin bird. In fact with a name like that it must feel a real "Charlie". Nice work Stewart.

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  20. Definitely something of a Darwin bird. In fact with a name like that it must feel a real "Charlie". Nice work Stewart.

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  21. Interesting looking bird...differently shaped body...nice shots

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  22. So interesting, Stewart, especially about the babies. Great photos!

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  23. Great photos of very interesting birds. I wonder do they make as much of a mess with their mound building as Brush-turkeys do?

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  24. Interesting bird, as usual. How strange that it gets no parental help at all. Wow.

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  25. How interesting that the babies survive on their own!

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  26. Now that is being independent...being on your own so young!! Never heard of this one either, Stewart...you are such a wealth of knowledge!!!...:)JP

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  27. Lovely to be introduced to the Orange footed Scrubfowl, thank you Stuart. Pretty birds and great shots as always.

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  28. They have such a compact little body! I saw something on PBS about a similar bird that lays it's eggs in volcanic sand. (if memory serves) The sand keeps the eggs warm and the when the chicks hatch they're on their own just like your scrub-fowl! Amazing!

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  29. Now there's another bird I've never heard of...time to get a field guide for the birds of Australia...cool shots Stewart!

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  30. I'm glad they don't live here. I have enough problems with the bush turkey. I have a post on birds today so I made a link but i don't know much about them other than they are beautiful. I don't even know if I have the ID right. If you have time maybe you could help.Hope you are having a great time in Darwin. Must go to NT Wildlife Sanctuary and see the birds.

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  31. Never heard of this bird before. It's quite interesting.

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  32. Hello, they are cool looking birds. I like the crest thingy on their heads. Happy Sunday, enjoy your new week ahead!

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