Wednesday, 17 February 2016

Wild Bird Wednesday 186 - Ruddy Turnstones

These birds are Ruddy Turnstones (Arenaria interpres) another bird the breeds in the high Arctic but spends the summer in Australia.  I am always impressed by this kind of migration - but when it involves flying to an island as small as Lord Howe I become even more impressed.

These birds were feeding on a bed of algae that had been exposed at low tide - so I suppose these could technically be called Turnfronds as they were not turning stones at all.  The light was stunningly bright, which may explain why the birds do not look that 'Ruddy' - although they are clearly not in their full breeding plumage either.

I dont think these are the best images I have made, but I can't help but like the inquisitive looks on the birds faces as the peek under the algae looking for food.









Now it's over to you to join in - click the blue button and off you go.  SM


36 comments:

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

It has been awhile since you've posted a bird I'm familiar with! I also enjoy watching these guys exploring ... They are around our beaches in the wintertime too (in Florida). Thank you for hosting and for the great pictures here .

Kusum Sanu said...

Wow! never seen these birds, may be endemic to AUS.

Marcia said...

Amazing the navigation system of birds. Amelia Earhart may not have disappeared if humans had such a navigation instinct.

Brian King said...

Cute little birds! Nicely camouflaged even among green.

Rhodesia said...

Lovely photos. Migration in birds always amazes me, so clever to know where to be for the right weather. Wish I could afford to migrate in the European winter! Diane

NatureFootstep said...

they are beautiful birds I love to see. I´ve seen them in Morocco. Probably during the migration then :)

TexWisGirl said...

very cute birds.

Mama Zen said...

Really nice shots, Stewart!

Author R. Mac Wheeler said...

They look a lot like the sandpipers we have down this way. Love to watch them work their way across the beach. Beautiful creatures.

Frank said...

A delightful 'chunky' wader that is still on my photo hit list. I'll look forward to seeing them again later this month when I lead a trip to the coast.

Denise inVA said...

Adorable looking birds. They would be fun to observe.

Nora said...

We have the same ones here. Migration is such an incredible mystery and wonder to me. How these birds can come here from so far away. Great shots of the little shorebirds. Thanks so much for hosting this birdy meme for all of us who love birds.

eileeninmd said...

Hello Stewart, The Ruddy Turnstones are one bird I am familiar with seen here in the spring and summer. I did not know they were also in Australia. Wonderful photos, thanks for hosting. Enjoy your week!

John eos shooter said...

I love ruddy turnstones! Gr. John

Kenneth Cole Schneider said...

Their migration is an amazing feat.

Mary Cromer said...

Ha-ha yes, Turnfronds rater than Turnstones in this case for sure. They are so pretty. I apologize for not feeling my best and missing a couple of entries in past weeks, but I am gaining on the down side and rising to the day~

Neesie said...

Oh how I wish I could fly to Australia for the summer. I've only been back here in the UK for two years but I miss that southern hemisphere light so much.
Fantastic photographs of a bird I've never seen before. I'm astounded by their migrating skills.
I'm a great bird lover and spend a fortune filling three feeding stations around my home. When we first arrived back from Melbourne we hardly had any birds visit the garden.
I'm quite proud of the fact that I've increased the population ten fold!

Dave Lewis said...

I love watching them when they migrate through my neck of the woods here in Ohio! Great shots as always!

Sylvia K said...

Fun looking birds and great captures as always, Stewart!!

Linda W. said...

"Who's that guy with the camera interrupting our dinner?" Cute capture of the bird's expressions!

Christian Perrin said...

I always love seeing 'turnfronds', they are quite a busy and colourful wader! Nice photos :)

Lea said...

I like the last photo the best!
Thanks for hosting this meme
Lea

Breathtaking said...

Hello Stewart!:) I like watching these birds, sometimes hard to capture because they are fast little movers, they seem to run rather than walk. I sometimes refere to them as Turn Seaweeds, as that is what I observe on our shores.

Marilyn Kircus said...

That is one of our most common shorebirds in winter on the Upper Texas Coast. You inspired me to find out just where they go. Here is the link to the species distribution based on the observation data turned in to eBird. http://ebird.org/ebird/map/rudtur?neg=true&env.minX=&env.minY=&env.maxX=&env.maxY=&zh=false&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2016

JP A Quiet Corner said...

Stewart, I cannot figure out how you are able to such great photos of the shore-birds. They are so fast and unpredictable...always darting and dashing!!...:)JP

maryaustria said...

These are beautiful birds! I have never seen them before! Gorgeous photos!

Marie C said...

Lovely birds! So glad the algae was exposed. You were able to get some great photos.

June Caedmon said...

You always feature the most interesting birds, Stewart - always a pleasure!

Linda said...

I've got tips for photography birds from your window! http://webcroft.blogspot.com/2016/02/tips-bird-feeders-for-photography.html

Pat Tillett said...

Mother Nature equips them with some amazing navigation equipment.
Great photos Stewart, even better when enlarged.

Phil Slade said...

Hi Stewart. Turnstones just get everywhere. I even saw them in Lanzarote and Fuerteventura, not to mention just down the road at Knott End. Such amazing long-distance migrants.

Anne (cornucopia) said...

Great photos, Stewart. They remind me of Sand Pipers and Yellow Legs. There is something fascinating about the way these birds walk around on the shore edge, poking around for food.

Phyllis Oller said...

I love the look on their faces too, very intent on what they are doing,thanks for sharing & for hosting!phyllis

Nathalie Santa Maria said...

TRès belle série Stewart, nice bird !

JOY @ http://joysjotsshots.blogspot.com/ said...

Your facts make the Turnstones even more fascinating.

edenhills said...

What pretty birds!