Monday, January 14, 2013

Our World Tuesday - Masons Falls

While summer is a time when we can relax, it has a darker side in Australia.  Summer brings the threat of bush fires on most days - and when the hot north wind blows the fire risk grows with each breath of wind.

This is what happened three years ago when 173 people died on 7th February - it was a terrible day, and there has never been a day when the fire risk was higher.

We recently visited some of the areas that had been burnt.  While much of the bush land has undergone a remarkable regrowth, the empty house blocks and brand new buildings speak of a different story.  I still found it a strangely unsettling experience to visit the places where people so recently died.  The street names were like a series of flash backs to the news stories of the day.

Much of the infra-structure in the area was destroyed by the fire and the National Parks staff have been slowly repairing and reopening the park.  One of the most recently opened was Masons Falls.

We have had a few dry months - which is already raising the spectre of fire again - so there was not much water falling down the falls, but it was nice to get back into the forest.



This is a link to this part of the King Lake National Park.

You can find more images from around the world at Our World Tuesday.

Enjoy the pictures.


16 comments:

Carole M. said...

it certainly would've been some eerie walking those places. It was indeed a tragic time for so many to experience. Those of us who were safe, watched in horror at the news each night. The falls is beautiful Stewart, I'm sure you enjoyed this walk through the bushland and seeing that scenery

Kerri said...

What a sad sad memory....

Fun60 said...

The regeneration of the greenery belies the tragedy which befell that area. Let's hope there is never a repeat of that dreadful day.

Gail Dixon (Louisiana Belle) said...

Hope you all can avoid a repeat of the fire situation. So sad...

Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

We have our wildfires here in the States, California being one where people are the most affected but I think the fires there in Australia sound much much worse. I can relate to your feelings revisiting these places.

Sylvia K said...

Sad memories indeed, Stewart!! I'm sure it is difficult to visit there without thinking/feeling for all of those who were lost! It does look like a lovely park and beautiful falls! Great shots for the day!

TexWisGirl said...

it is beautiful. the deaths are tragic, and with fire season already starting so severely for you again...

DIMI said...

Dear Stewart,i watch every day on TV news ,about the fires ,and i'm very sad seeing the Koalas and the kangaro╬┐s wounded,what a shame!Sad memories indeed!Thank you for visiting my blog!Im realy glad seeing a friend from Melbourne!!Have a lovely week!!
Dimi..

Karen said...

It would be difficult to visit a place so marred by tradgedy. It was a beautiful park, and will be again. The ability of the bush to rejuvenate is amazing.

Luna Miranda said...

bush fires are certainly destructive. i hope this year the tragedy will not be repeated. fortunately for us here, we don't have wildfires...fires here usually are the result of people's carelessness.

the waterfall is beautiful, must be even more when there's water.:p

ladyfi said...

How eerie for you. Hoping you have a less hot summer this year.

eileeninmd said...

It is sad, to loose so many people and houses in the fires. I do hope this year is better, the fires are so scary. The park and falls look beautiful. Wishing you a happy week ahead.

eileeninmd said...

It is sad, to loose so many people and houses in the fires. I do hope this year is better, the fires are so scary. The park and falls look beautiful. Wishing you a happy week ahead.

Kusum Sanu said...

Yep, forest fires destroy much! Glad to have some info on national parks of Australia.

Gary said...

I was listening to a radio Australia interview of your chief Government weather forecaster,I think that was his title,who said that a four degree temperature rise will spell a complete disaster for Australia. He was commenting on the resistance of Australians to the concept of global warming and the use of coal. This was followed the next morning by a CBC program that said that 50% of the Boreal Forest will be destroyed by wildfire by 2075 because global warming(carbon emissions) set up the humid conditions that enable or foster wildfire. Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Liz said...

It's been so incredibly dry up here too. Last week, I noticed one of our local dams was the lowest it's been in the last 2 years (when we had those severe floods). The extreme heat and the hot northerly winds have created the perfect conditions for bushfires. We've had a few but nothing like Tasmania!!
It must have been quite a surreal experience walking in that area!